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Dither Fish

andrew41298

New Member
Just wondering what dither fish people recommend for my 90 litre with my Apistogramma Baenschi. I was thinking of pencilfish and maybe some pygmy cories or otocinclus
 

dw1305

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member

Samala

Member
Agree with Darrel. Have kept various pencilfish (N. marginatus, N. beckfordi, N. espei) with A. cf. eunotus Orangeschawnz and now A. borellii (also M. ramirezi) and they are great tankmates. Beckfordi especially are very forgiving and resilient even with tenacious breeding Apisto females harassing them.
 

JoseF

New Member
Coryodoras Pygmaeus or Habrosus for mid-water or bottom focus, respectively. Pygmaeus are especially interesting in how they school plus will tend to spend more time off the bottom of the tank and away from the areas that the apistos may spawn in. Add a few male endlers are hardy and will adapt to the softer water even if they aren't naturally found with apistos. Interesting in my tank the endlers will sometimes school with Pygmaeus... even when they aren't interested in trying breed :) Generally all three are also relatively easy to find.
 

MacZ

Active Member
Isn't that stressful for Apistogramma ?
Genuine question, I don't have either yet.

The movement? Not really, as rasboras tend to stay higher up in the watercolumn than Apistos. With those small rasboras I would be just wary if bigger Apistos wouldn't try to eat them. Just lately someone I know had a case of a A. cacatuoides almost choking on a Corydoras pygmaeus. The Cory didn't make it as the vet had to cut it out of the Apistos mouth. The Apisto made it, though.
 

anewbie

Member
Yea. That is one thing that concerns me about male cockatoo. They have the largest mouth I've seen. However, i suspect there is virtually no dither you could keep with a cockatoo without some risk of it eating it. I have kubotai and galaxy rasbora with mine. I never bothered to try to count them so i have no clue is one is vanishing now and then. I suppose i should pay more attention but if it happens. I would say if i did it over and now that i know more i would not purchase the cockatoo (not just because of the big mouth); i just find them to not have as much personality as some of the other apisto i'm trying.


The movement? Not really, as rasboras tend to stay higher up in the watercolumn than Apistos. With those small rasboras I would be just wary if bigger Apistos wouldn't try to eat them. Just lately someone I know had a case of a A. cacatuoides almost choking on a Corydoras pygmaeus. The Cory didn't make it as the vet had to cut it out of the Apistos mouth. The Apisto made it, though.
 

Mike Wise

Moderator
Staff member
5 Year Member
By their nature apistos are not predatory on fish. In the wild their primary diet is composed of crustaceans and insect larvae. That being said, I also know than any fish that can get other fish in its mouth - will.
 
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