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Water Changes

Hey all, this is one of those 'silly questions' that is actually silly when you say theres not such thing as a silly question:
When you do your water change, how do you get the replacement water up to the required temperature?

Thanks heaps,
Jeremy
 

dw1305

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Hi all,
Hey all, this is one of those 'silly questions' that is actually silly when you say theres not such thing as a silly question:When you do your water change, how do you get the replacement water up to the required temperature?
I don't think it is a silly question at all. I think the answer depends on how much water you change and the temperature differential between the water change water and the tank water. If I was going to change enough water to depress the tank temperature by more than ~ 5oC I would warm the water.

If you use EI, and are going for a 50% water change? I would definitely warm the water. Many people, who use tap water, have a mixer tap and add hot water to their cold water.

Personally I use rainwater and I only change about 10% of the water, but I do it every day. I bring the water in overnight, but it will still often be only 12 - 15oC when I add it to the tanks in the winter.

I used to warm it up, because I'd read about thermal shock etc, but I noticed that fish learnt that there were likely to be Daphnia in the water change water, and they would jostle for position right in the stream of cold water entering the tank. You can see the denser cold water sinking and the fish swimming in and out of the cold water stream, so they are passing from water at ~26oC to water at 15oC and back again. Because of this II don't bother warming the water now and it hasn't impacted plant growth or fish health.

cheers Darrel
 
Thanks Darrel,

A few questions:
What's EI?
I do use tap water, but can I use the hot water from the tap? Is that ok for the fish?
Yeah I've noticed my Rasboras love swimming through the cold water - but I am a little worried of shock. At the same time I haven't been heating the water and all the fish seem fine.

Thanks so much again for the advice :))
 

dw1305

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Hi all,
What's EI?
Sorry it is <"Estimative Index">, a method where you add an excess of plant nutrients, to a CO2 enhanced tank, to ensure optimal plant growth. I saw the "Aquascaper" in your user name and that was why I added it in.

I'm a planted tank keeper, but I use an alternative approach ("Duckweed Index")where you use the growth and leaf colour of a floating plant to indicate when to add nutrients.
I do use tap water, but can I use the hot water from the tap?
I've never been a tap water user, but my understanding <"is that you can">.

cheers Darrel
 

Mike Wise

Moderator
Staff member
5 Year Member
For me it depends on the tank. For those tanks that do not need special water values I use mixed hot/cold tap water. I just run a hose from the faucet to the tank, add dechlorinator to the tank and run water straight from the tap. For those that require soft or blackwater conditions I have tanks in my heated fish room of straight R/O and peat treated R/O. These are at the same temperature as the room so I just pump it into the tanks.
 

Ben Rhau

Member
I think if the water is similar by feel, the temperature is close enough to use, especially if the water change is small. I have an IR thermometer for the kitchen that I use to spot check. Though it’s not necessary to be this precise, it is a really easy way to get it exactly right by adjusting the hot and cold taps.
 

MacZ

Member
I use tap water cut with distilled water (RO unit will be bought with the next paycheck), because my tap has extremely high nitrate levels (close to the legal max in my country). At least the tap is not chlorinated and the pipes in the house are safe, so no water conditioners needed. I know at what setting my tap gives the right temp for my tank, I'm always within 1-2°C of the range I'm aiming for.
I change 30-50% every week, as the plants deplete KH and GH fast and I want to prevent sudden acidity drops. PH is quite stable, between 6.4 to 6.6 depending on the time of day.
 
I have a bit of a follow up question re water changes.
I always use a gravel vac and use it to get rid of the mulm. Should I be doing this or will it be beneficial for the plants in my planted tank?
 

MacZ

Member
I always use a gravel vac and use it to get rid of the mulm. Should I be doing this or will it be beneficial for the plants in my planted tank?

Depends on the type of substrate. With sand vacuuming is absolutely unneccessary.

Hi,

Don´t know about plants but the fry love to forage in the mulm. 2017 was the last year I used a gravel vac.

Having leaf litter everywhere: Mulm is no problem for plants.
 

MacZ

Member
Depends on the mulm then. If it's only fish waste and rotting food vacuuming is necessary. Most here - I guess - will likely have tanks with a lot of rotting plant matter, which can be left in.
 
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