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Panduro and Nijsseni

Discussion in 'Apistogramma' started by vpik001, Jun 6, 2019.

  1. vpik001

    vpik001 New Member

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    Hi All,

    There are new arrivals in my LPS - Apistogramma Panduro and Nijsseni. I read some threads and watched some videos about them. However, I would like to confirm with you as experts my understanding and get valuable recommendations before I buy them and go into trouble :).

    1. Panduro is monogamous species. So would it better to buy 2 pairs in order to get at least one bonded pair out of them? Or one pair should be fine and they will bond anywhere?

    2. Nijsseni is not monogamous species. So I should I be fine if I buy only one pair?

    3. Is it OK to keep them together since they mature? I mean 2 pairs of Panduro together and separately, 2 pairs of Nijsseni together? Is it OK if I put them in two adjacent tanks with transparent glass and they will see each other, i.e. Panduro will see through the glass Nijsseni. Would it create better bonding for Panduro?

    4. I watched videos and saw that both Panduro and Nijsseni males look after the fry and their females allow to do this. Is it always a case? Could please give me some tips or links to threads where it had been already discussed?

    It does not work with Agassizii and Cacatuoides females when they are breeding. Once they have got eggs I need to remove males as females chase them like crazy. Even in the big and full of hidden spots tank.

    4. Some females of both Panduro and Nijsseni have black spots over the whole body, but some females only have black spots on their heads. I found more beautiful if females have more black spots. I think it is better genes. What do you think?

    Any other recommendations are welcome. :)

    Thanking you in advance.
  2. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

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    Good for you for getting others' opinions before jumping into something new to you. I've kept and bred all of the mentioned species so here are my opinions. One caveat - fish are individuals, just like people, so there can be exceptions to any rule.

    Both species belong to the nijsseni-group and behave somewhat the same. Both form breeding pair - not bonded pairs. A pair can successfully breed and raise fry several times in harmony, but an unsuccessful breeding attempt can also lead to a breakup of the pair. When this happens each will look for a 'better' partner. I have found A. nijsseni to be more 'choosy' about partners than A. panduro. As such, I generally buy 6 fish - 2 males and 4 females if possible or 3 pairs.

    It really depends on the size of the tank and how it's laid out. Realize that once 2 fish form a breeding pair, they will want to remove any competition. When this happens you have 2 fish attacking individual fish - not a good idea. I prefer to start breeding tanks with 1 male and 2 females. Then I keep a close look for any bonding behavior i.e. attacking the female not chosen. I always put a floating piece of pipe as a refuge for the 'loser'.

    Generally, males are accepted near the fry more so than most species where the female is the sole caregiver. Of course this depends on the individual fish.

    This has all to do with the how more polygamous species operate. In the wild males are too busy driving off predators and competitors to interact much with a mother and fry. In an aquarium predators and competitor are not usually there. Without anything constructive to do males often bother a brooding female. Brooding females don't want a bright, showy, male that can attract a predator near her fry. So she will try to drive him away.

    There are 2 populations (at least) of A. panduro. On one females in brood dress show a large oval flank patch - but not as large as on A. nijsseni. The other population (Brustband/Breastband) shows a broad vertical band that extends over much of the flanks at the Bar 3 location. Both populations show a cheekstripe on the operculum.

    A. nijsseni has only one form in the willd. Brooding females show a very large flank patch at Bar 3 and the gill cover is almost entirely black.

    Domestic raised fish often show some variations in color pattern where the flank patch can be smaller on one side than the other, or missing altogether. I have a similar experience with females of A. wolli, another nijsseni-group species. Specimens TomC & I collected in Peru all had similar spots on both sides. Females from my tank-raised specimens not uncommonly have a spot only on 1 side. I prefer to breed females with spots on both sides.

    Hope this helps.
    pizzagetsmefrisky and ButtNekkid like this.
  3. vpik001

    vpik001 New Member

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    Thank you very much Mike! You are very helpful as usual! :)
    I will post some photos once I have bought them. I decided to buy two pairs of each species.

    Recently I bought two pairs of Agassizii Alenquer. Such a luck! What a gorgeous fish! They are still young, I think 6-7 months old, however one male starts to have somewhat redish at the bottom of his tale. It looks really beautiful in combination of green and white net over his tale.