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New to Dwarf Cichlids

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by Tbot2021, Mar 1, 2019.

  1. Tbot2021

    Tbot2021 New Member

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    Hi,

    I am currently in the process of cycling my 60 gal aquarium that I got for Christmas. I am new to dwarf cichlids and would like to stock it with a Cockatoo, electric blue ram, rainbow krib and Bolivian ram. Is this possible?

    I am thinking I would have a single specimen of each species, probably male, but I want to make sure they won't be aggressive towards each other and that they will have enough room for their own territory. I also am wondering if a single specimen can be happy and thrive or if I would be better doing a species specific tank.

    I am also wondering about tankmates for a peaceful community. I would like to have corys in the tank too and maybe some schooling species to occupy the top of the tank. Any thought or suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks!
  2. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

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    Welcome. I don't recommend this community for 2 reasons. Kribs being West African have a very different threat/submission response compared to Neotropical cichlids. This can result in increased aggression. Orinoco Rams need a higher temperature than other dwarf cichlids, best at least 84°F/30°C.
  3. Tbot2021

    Tbot2021 New Member

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    IMG_5207.JPG Mike,

    Thanks for the guidance! I am so taken with the apistogramma and other than my 10 gallon betta tank I only have the 60 gallon I am currently cycling. There are so many species I would like to keep I just don't have endless space or funds for more than this 60 gal so in your opinion is there a couple good species I could house together. Or should I set up a tank with a single apistogramma species like a ram harem?
  4. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

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    Well, your tank is fairly open. I don't see many visual territorial boundaries that you would need to safely keep several different species. If you really do want several species in the same tank I suggest that the aquascaping be much more complex. Which species? I suggest you choose your favorite species and then add other species that look different in body shape and finnage, and have a similar temperament. One option is an apisto species and Bolivian Rams/Laetacara which inhabit different biotopes in the same type of habitat.
    dw1305 likes this.
  5. dw1305

    dw1305 Well-Known Member 5 Year Member

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    Hi all,
    Are you adding ammonia to cycle the tank? If you are? You can stop, it doesn't serve any useful purpose. If you have a tank without plants and a substrate you are obliged to rely on the nitrifying organisms in the filter, but when you have plants there are much more resilient ways of ensuring nitrification.

    There has been a lot of scientific research on nitrifying organisms, using rDNA and RNA libraries, which has shown that Archaea are much more important than had been realised in nitrification and that the bacteria found under high ammonia loadings aren't the micro-organisms found in aquarium filters.

    The basic reason is that ammonia isn't the most important factor in biological filtration, it is oxygen. Have a look at Dr Stephan Tanner's <"Bacteria Revealed"> and <"Aquarium biofiltration">, <"Water quality: a holistic approach"> & <"Aquatic plants and nitrogen"> by Dr Tim Hovanec.

    At the moment you just need to a lot more plants and as they grow in, this will also help to create a more complex environment (and break up the line of sight) that Mike mentions.

    cheers Darrel