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1st D. maculatus spawn

dw1305

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Hi all,
Thanks Raymond, I'm really hoping to get a female or some more juveniles.
I didn't know that they had fry, subsequently I've also found some Corydoras pygmaeus fry as well. These are a couple of the C. hastatus fry with the male Dicrossus:

It is a very weedy tank, and it is in the back of the lab., but I didn't see any of the C. hastatus for several years, and I was really surprised to find I still had some. They magically re-appeared when I "stored" some spare Corydoras pygmaeus in the tank. I've just left both of the dwarf Cories species in the tank because I can't catch them without dismantling the whole tank.

cheers Darrel
 

Heartnet

New Member
5 Year Member
That's a beautifuk D. mac. you got there. How big is the fella? And congrats on the cory juvies. Unexpected breeding/fry is one of the best treat this hobby can give us.
 

raymond82

Member
but I didn't see any of the C. hastatus for several years, and I was really surprised to find I still had some.
That's quite amazing! Now my tanks are set up for breeding and control over what my fish are doing, in the future I would love to have a small jungle like that!
 

dw1305

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Hi all,
How big is the fella?
He is quite large, about 10cm total length. I've had them since they were quite small and until I found the dead female they had been entirely un-problematic to keep.
in the future I would love to have a small jungle like that!
This is another view, the fry are right in the centre of the image. Because I can't maintain the tank every day (and some time I have up to 2 weeks away from the lab.) I wanted a very resilient set-up.

The roots are mainly from Limnobium laevigatum, Anubias "hastifolia" and Hygrophila corymbosa, the latter forms a big emergent clump. As well as the normal Amazon Swords, Cryptocoryne spp., Ferns and Moss I like emergents and floaters as they have access to aerial CO2 and can potentially mop up a lot of ammonia if I have death etc whilst I'm away.



cheers Darrel
 

dw1305

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Hi all,
Gerald wrote:
True, but they can be bloat-prone, so don't let their non-pickiness lull you into complacency with one or two easy foods. Feed Dicrossus a diverse diet including cooked veggies to avoid fatty liver/kidney degeneration and bloat, especially as they get older.
I think I probably didn't pay enough attention to Gerald's comments over Xmas (and probably whilst I've been busy with term since September) and I've lost the male as well now. Because I've only been in the lab off and on I think I probably over did the amount of worms, (both Red and Grindal), fed less Daphnia and a couple of times I put in a large helping of live Black-worms (Lumbriculus), which they really enjoyed at the time, but may have been a mistake.

I had them for about 15 months (from juvenile), and they spawned several times, but I never got any fry survive. They were extremely interesting and attractive fish, and I'm really sorry that I've managed to kill them off. So hopefully I'm now both sadder and wiser.

cheers Darrel
 

wethumbs

Active Member
5 Year Member
I would recommend getting a harem as the male will breed with multiple females since there is no actual pair bonding taken place. Once the spawning has completed, the male is chased away by the female. Initially, the male would try to approach the spawning site thinking the spawning is still happening, only to be chased away by the female. Eventually, he would get the point and stay away for good.

I always use the male's behavior to tell me if there is a spawn in the tank.
 
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