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Need some help

Discussion in 'Dwarf Cichlid Health' started by Andrew Jordan, Jul 25, 2017.

  1. Andrew Jordan

    Andrew Jordan New Member

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    Hello everyone, I have an established breeding pair of cacatuoides in a 29 gallon tank and all was going well until recently. My female spawned about 12 days ago, she raised them up to free swimming before they disappeared after about 6 days later due to not getting enough nutrition. Ever since losing her fry this time she has begun acting strangely, she is not coming out as often and is doing this weird thing when she eats where she'll spit food out multiple times and eventually swim away. I haven't noticed any obvious physical signs of disease but I'm wonder if I should be concerned with internal parasites? The tank is kept at 78-76 degrees Fahrenheit, 0 ammonia and nitrites and about 10 ppm nitrates I do a 30% water change consisting of RoDi water every 4 days or so. If anyone could give me some advice or just let me know if I'm being paranoid I would appreciate it!

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  2. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

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    What are you feeding your fish?
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  3. Andrew Jordan

    Andrew Jordan New Member

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    Feeding everything from live and frozen brine shrimp, frozen daphnia and they just recently started eating southern delight nano pellets. I alternate their feedings throughout the week
  4. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

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    Well, their diet isn't the problem. I don't know what to suggest, sorry.
  5. Yvonne G

    Yvonne G Administrator

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    Pardon my ignorance, I know nothing about fish (I'm the spam detector), but is this a species that holds their young in their mouth? If so, could it be she's thinking maybe the food is her young, so she spits it out? Just ignore me if I'm all wet.
  6. Andrew Jordan

    Andrew Jordan New Member

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    From my knowledge they aren't mouthbrooders like African cichlids, they will pick and move around their fry in their mouths but they never hold them in there plus she doesn't have any fry right now!
  7. Andrew Jordan

    Andrew Jordan New Member

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    Hey Mike I haven't been able to find any solid references about apistos and live black worms. I figured since she wasn't eating what she usually does switching up her diet again might help and the live food may trigger her to start eating again what's your thoughts? I know bloodworms aren't the best but figured I could get your take on blackworms.
  8. dw1305

    dw1305 Well-Known Member 5 Year Member

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    Hi all,
    They really, really like them, but are probably best fed in moderation.

    cheers Darrel
  9. Andrew Jordan

    Andrew Jordan New Member

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    Moderation being a few times a month? Or can they be fed once a week, I fed a few today and noticed my female actually ate and didn't spit them back out so it was good to see her eating again. I'm just hoping I can get her to start taking other foods as well now. Thank you for the info!
  10. dw1305

    dw1305 Well-Known Member 5 Year Member

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    Hi all,
    I'd probably go for once a week.

    I used to feed either grindal and/or black-worms every day in the winter when I didn't have much other live food.

    The culture method I use is in <"UKAPS: Blackworm and Asellus bucket">.

    When I fed more Black-worms the fish did really well for ~18 months, coloured up and bred etc. but they tended to get fat, and very few of them made it past two years old.

    cheers Darrel
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  11. Andrew Jordan

    Andrew Jordan New Member

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    Okay thank you for the information I won't feed them all the time then, is it possible that my female has just gotten bored of her regular diet? I'm looking for new foods to try and feed on a consistent basis to get her eating more and more and not dependent on brine shrimp daphnia and pellets. I'm going to look into cultivating some grindal worms for them and see if they enjoy that, any other recommendations to try and tempt them. With the grindal worms can these be fed more regularly as opposed to black worms? Also in order to get them to try these new foods do you recommend letting them go without food for a few days and then slowly introducing multiple foods? Or is there a better alternative? Sorry for all the questions just trying to make my fish as happy as possible!
  12. gerald

    gerald Well-Known Member 5 Year Member

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    Can you find mosquito larvae in your neighborhood? Check your neighbors' plant bots, bird baths, etc. Best ever "recovery" food for stressed or sick carnivorous and omnivorous fish. Small red earthworms (the kind you find in leaf piles) are also excellent, chopped to a suitable size.
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  13. Mike Wise

    Mike Wise Moderator Staff Member 5 Year Member

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    Agree with Gerald on mosquito larvae. It's a natural food for most apistos (small insect larvae). Any worm of suitable size is great for conditioning or encouraing fish to start eating, but they all have the same problem - high fat content. Overfeeding, like Darrel mentioned leads to obesity and early death.
  14. Andrew Jordan

    Andrew Jordan New Member

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    So once again is okay every now and then but not consistently similar to the black worms, and I'll see what I can do about the mosquito larva. I'm sure I'll be able to find some or worst comes to worst make my own standing water using a 5 gallon bucket and just harvest them that way. Thank you again guys!

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